Home POLITICS Australia: No changes to news media law after Facebook fallout

Australia: No changes to news media law after Facebook fallout

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 18: In this photo illustration a message is seen on Facebook mobile, on February 18, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. Facebook has banned publishers and users in Australia from posting and sharing news content as the Australian government prepares to pass laws that will require social media companies to pay news publishers for sharing or using content on their platforms. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 18: In this photo illustration a message is seen on Facebook mobile, on February 18, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. Facebook has banned publishers and users in Australia from posting and sharing news content as the Australian government prepares to pass laws that will require social media companies to pay news publishers for sharing or using content on their platforms. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – FEBRUARY 18: In this photo illustration, a message is seen on Facebook mobile, on February 18, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)

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UPDATED 5:00 PM PT – Monday, February 22, 2021

Australia took a hardline stance on Facebook after the company attempted to cancel news and government agencies in the country.

On Monday, leaders of the Australian Parliament said there will be no changes to the proposed law, which would make social media companies pay for news content. The decision blocked any possibility to negotiate better terms for U.S.-based tech giants.

Last week, Facebook briefly banned a number of Australian media and state agencies, while Google opened talks to keep doing business as usual. Australian officials said Big Tech bias has gone too far.

“Look, I’ll let legal minds go over those issues. My focus though is to get this issue resolved, positively, to ensure that the protections that we want to put in place,” Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said. “To ensure that we have a free and democratic society here that supported by an open news media can continue, that’s a very important part of who we are.”

CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA - APRIL 11: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison talks to the media at a press conference announcing an election date at Parliament House on April 11, 2019 in Canberra, Australia. Scott Morrison visited the Governor General today to ask for an election on 18 May. All 151 House of Representatives seats will be up for election. (Photo by Tracey Nearmy/Getty Images)

CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA – APRIL 11: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison spoke to the media at a press conference at Parliament House on April 11, 2019 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Tracey Nearmy/Getty Images)

 

A final vote on the bill is slated for Tuesday.

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